Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 14th International Conference on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Madrid, Spain.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Camelia Matei Ghimbeu

Researcher, Institute of Materials Science of Mulhouse (IS2M-CNRS), France

Keynote: Design of Pd-based nanoalloy particles confined into mesoporous carbon: Size, composition and confinement effects on the interactions with hydrogen

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Camelia Matei Ghimbeu photo
Biography:

Camelia Matei Ghimbeu is a Researcher at Institute of Materials Science of Mulhouse (IS2M-CNRS), France. She received her PhD from University of Metz in 2007, France and TU Delft, The Netherlands and her Habilitation in 2015 from University of Haute Alsace, France. She is the author of 55 articles and about 100 communications, her research interests are focused on the design of carbon hybrid materials with controlled characteristics for energy storage and environmental applications. She is animating the research axe “Carbon and Hybrid Materials” at IS2M, and she is member of French Network of Electrochemical Storage of Energy (RS2E).

Abstract:

Supported metal nanoparticles (NPs) with well controlled size, dispersion and shape are of great interest in many fields of applications. They exhibit large surface to volume ratio, faster molecular diffusion pathways and synergetic effects rising from the interaction with the support. Mesoporous carbons are widely employed to support such particles affording good stabilization through nanoconfinement effects leading to small and well dispersed NPs. Supported Pd-based alloys with noble or transition metals on carbon are tremendously studied in catalysis while hydrogen storage studies are scarce. In the present work two main strategies were developed to synthesize a series of Pdx-M100-x alloys NPs (where M=Co, Ni, Rh, Pt and x=10, 25, 50, 75, 90) having different compositions, tunable particle size and location in the carbon network. The first approach is the incipient wetness impregnation of carbon host with a metallic solution, followed by hydrogen reduction at 300-500°C while the second approach is a one-pot method where the metallic particles are formed in-situ during the synthesis of carbon framework at 600°C. The optimization of NPs size was achieved by tuning several metal salt type, carbon precursors, cross-linkers and thermal reduction temperature while their location was directed mainly by the type of synthesis approach. The impregnation
favor the NPs location into the pores, while the one-pot in the walls of carbons. For several studied systems, alloy particles were formed in the whole composition range as highlighted by the linear relationship between the lattice parameter and the composition (Fig. 1a). Small particles with sizes ranging between 1.5 and 50 nm were prepared (Fig.1), the incipient method allowing obtaining always smaller particle sizes than the one-pot method (Fig. 1left). The hydrogen interactions with the nanoalloys were strongly influenced by their composition, size and confinement in the carbon network.

Keynote Forum

Pedro Gómez-Romero

CSIC Research Professor, Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Spain

Keynote: Nanofluids for energy applications
OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Pedro Gómez-Romero photo
Biography:

Pedro Gomez-Romero has completed his PhD in Chemistry from Georgetown University, USA in 1987 with Distinction. He served as a Full Professor and Group Leader
of NEO-Energy lab at ICN2 (CSIC), Sabbatical at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA (1998-99), Vice-director of MATGAS Technological Center (2010-2013)
and leads projects on nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion (lithium batteries, supercapacitors, graphene, flow batteries, solar-thermal energy, nanofluids). He is author of more than 200 publications, scientific editor of the books "Functional Hybrid Materials" P Gómez-Romero, C Sanchez (Eds.) (Wiley-VCH 2004) and “Metal Oxides in Supercapacitors” (Elsevier, 2017, D Dubal, P Gomez-Romero) (in preparation) and author of three award-winning popular science books. He is member of MRS, ECS, ISE, EuroScience and the Royal Society of Chemistry and Fellow of the Royal Society since 2014.

Abstract:

Nanofluids are homogeneous dispersions of nanoparticles in conventional base fluids which constitute an emerging type of unique liquid materials within the field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. They have been proposed and used for a variety of applications with very special emphasis on thermal properties and heat-transfer applications. Indeed, solids present better thermal conductivity and specific heat capacities than liquids but dispersing solid micro particles in fluids leads to clogging, a problem which is solved with nanoparticles. On the other hand, other energy-related applications are possible for nanofluids which have not been explored until very recently. In our group we are developing two different research lines dealing with nanofluids i) nanofluids for thermal applications and ii) Electroactive Nanofluids (ENFs) for energy storage in novel flow cells. The latter type includes a wide variety of nanofluids containing nanoparticles able to store electrical energy, whether through redox or capacitive mechanisms. We will present an overview of the use of nanofluids in the field of energy, from thermal to electroactive nanofluids with some final focus on our own recent results, including the first example of the application of ENF materials for the development of fast energy storage in flow cells. In this case, we have used a capacitive nanofluid based on graphene which would be the flow-cell analog of solid-electrode graphene supercapacitors.

Keynote Forum

Jordi Arbiol

Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Spain

Keynote: Free-standing nanostructures at atomic scale: From growth mechanisms to local properties at the nanoscale
OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jordi Arbiol photo
Biography:

Jordi Arbiol graduated in Physics at Universitat de Barcelona (UB). He also obtained his PhD (European Doctorate and PhD Extraordinary Award) in the field of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) applied to nanostructured materials. He was an Assistant Professor at UB. He has served as a Group Leader at Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC. He is currently the Vice President of the Spanish Microscopy Society (SME), apart from being a leader of the Group of Advanced Electron Nanoscopy at Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST). He has been awarded with the 2014 EMS Outstanding Paper Award, the EU40 Materials Prize 2014 (E-MRS), listed in the Top 40 under 40 Power List (2014) by The Analytical Scientist and the PhD Extraordinary Award in 2001 (UB).

Abstract:

Technology at the nanoscale has become one of the main challenges in science as new physical effects appear and can be modulated at will. Superconductors, materials for spintronics, electronics, optoelectronics, sensing, energy applications and new generations of functionalized materials are taking advantage of the low dimensionality, improving their properties and opening a new range of applications. As developments in materials science are pushing to the size limits of physics and chemistry, there is a critical need for understanding the origin of these unique physical properties (optical and electronic) and relate them to the changes originated at the atomic scale, e.g.: linked to changes in (electronic) structure of the material. In the present work, I will show how combining advanced electron microscopy imaging with electron spectroscopy, as well
as cathodoluminescence in an aberration corrected STEM will allow us to probe the elemental composition and electronic structure simultaneously with the optical properties in unprecedented spatial detail. The talk will focus on several examples in advanced nanomaterials for optical, plasmonic and energy  pplications. In this way the latest results obtained by my group on direct visualizing and modeling materials at atomic scale will help to understand their growth mechanisms (sometimes complex) and also correlate their physical properties (electronic and photonic) at sub-nanometer with their atomic scale
structure. The examples will cover a wide range of nanomaterials: Quantum structures self-assembled in a nanowire - quantum wires (1D) and quantum dots (0D) and other complex nanowire-like morphologies for photonic and energy applications (LEDs, lasers, quantum computing, single photon emitters, water splitting cells, batteries), nanomembranes and 2D sheets; as well as metal multiwall nanoboxes and nanoframes for 3D plasmonics.

  • Track 1 : Nano Particles Track 2 : Nano Electronic Devices Track 3 : Nano Scale Materials Track 4 : Scope of Nanomaterials Track 5 : Nanomaterials characterisation and synthesis Track 6 : Nanozymes Track 7 : Nanomaterials manufacturing technologies Track 8 : Nano Structures Track 9 : Nanomaterials Safety and regulations Track 10 : Materiomics
Speaker

Chair

Alain Demourgues

University of Bordeaux, France

Speaker

Co-Chair

Constantinos Sioutas

University of Southern California, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Constantinos Sioutas is the first holder of the Fred Champion Professorship in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC). His research has focused on investigations of the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to airborne ultrafine particulate pollutants generated by a variety of sources. He has developed many state-of-the-art technologies used by many academic institutions and national laboratories for aerosol sampling and characterization. He has authored over 300 peer-reviewed journal publications, and holds 13 US patents in the development of instrumentation for aerosol measurement and emissions control. His work has been cited in more than 15,000 scientific publications. He is the recipient of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) David Sinclair Award in 2014 (AAAR’s highest distinction), the Hagen Smit Award of Atmospheric Environment for Seminal Publications, the 2010 Scientific and Technological Achievement Award by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and a Fulbright fellow.

Abstract:

To determine the organic constituents of ambient ultrafine particles (<0.18 um) and quantify the source contributions to PM0.18 organic carbon (OC), a sampling campaign was conducted at Central Los Angeles (LA) from 2012-2013. A novel hybrid molecular marker-chemical mass balance model was introduced and applied to estimate the contributions from mobile sources (including gasoline, diesel, and smoking vehicles), wood smoke, primary biogenic sources, and anthropogenic secondary organic carbon. Based
on the model output, a 57% decrease in contribution of mobile sources to the total OC from 2009 to 2013 was estimated. Comparison to previous studies in Central LA indicated significant reduction in concentrations of carbonaceous species such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons druing the past decade. The analysis of historical trends in ambient PM oxidative potential measured by dithiothreitol (DTT) assay enabled us to assess the relative importance of tailpipe and non-tailpipe emissions on DTT activity in this area. Ambient PM0.18, the toxicity of which was found to be mainly dominated by tailpipe emissions, showed a consistent decrease in DTT activity levels in the past decade, likely due to major reductions in tailpipe emissions as a result of stringent regulations on mobile sources in the LA basin. Despite major reduction in ambient PM2.5 levels and vehicle tailpipe emissions, a slight but consistent increase in
the DTT redox activity of larger particles (PM2.5) was observed in the past decade. A follow-up on-road sampling campaign was conducted using a mobile instrumentation platform on major freeways of Los Angeles revealed the important role of both tailpipe and non-tailpipe traffic emissions on the overall oxidative potential of PM2.5. Increased contributions of certain groups of metals and trace elements that are indicators of non-tailpipe emissions compared to previous studies provide evidence on the increasing importance of non-tailpipe emissions to the oxidative potential of on-road PM2.5 as vehicule tailpipe emissions becomes cleaner.

Speaker
Biography:

Carlo Naddeo is a Physicist currently in service at University of Salerno - Department of Industrial Engineering as Assistant Researcher. He actively collaborates in research activities related to the study of physical properties and durability of functional and structural polymeric materials and nanocomposites. As part of these collaborations, he has produced over 50 publications in international journals and more than 40 contributions at conferences.

Abstract:

Thermal management with conductive polymeric nano-composites has become a central task of industrial interest for many applications ranging from exchangers in electric and electronic systems to electronic packaging and photovoltaic devices. In order to enhance the thermal conductivity of polymeric composites there is a tendency to incorporate thermally conductive nano-fillers in the polymeric matrix. Actually the most widely used are the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to their outstanding mechanical, electrical and thermal properties together with a high aspect ratio and surface area. The incorporation of CNTs into the polymer matrix has significantly enhanced mechanical and electrical performance of final composite material but until now the desired enhancement in thermal conductivity has not been achieved. The aim of this work is to carry out a preliminary experimental investigation of thermal properties and heat conduction in epoxy nanocomposites prepared by dispersing low concentrations of different kinds of nanofillers, such as 1-D multiwall carbon nanotubes and 2-D predominant shape exfoliated graphite (EG) within an aeronautic resin based on a tetrafunctional epoxy precursor. For the analyzed epoxy formulations the best results are obtained using EG as nanofillers. The curing degree for the EG-based epoxy  nanocomposites cured up to 200°C is very high compared to unfilled epoxy resin, reaching up to 100%. EG nanoparticles also accelerate the curing process of the epoxy resin of about 20°C and this is most likely due to better phonon conduction through carbonaceous nanostructures with predominantly  two-dimensional flat shape. This is confirmed by experimental values of thermal conductivity that show an increase of 300% for 3% of Exfoliated Graphite embedded in tetrafunctional epoxy resin. In light of these results it is clearly evident the potential of 2-D graphene sheets as promising nanofillers able to meet the ambitious requirements in the thermal management for high-performance nanocomposites.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ramon J Peláez obtained his PhD from Valladolid University and obtained his first Post-doctoral training at Laboratoire Aime-Coton (CNRS). He is currently a research fellow Post-doc at the Institute of Optics (CSIC). He has published more than 45 papers in specialized and peer-reviewed journals. His research interests in the field of nano-materials include periodic nanostructured materials, plasmonic metal nanoparticles, nanostructures generated by pulsed laser deposition and laser induced dewetting.

Abstract:

Optical phenomena related to the electromagnetic response of metals led to the development of the emerging field of plasmonics. Electron density of metal nano-particles can couple with the electromagnetic radiation and plasmons are the oscillations of the free electrons related to the formation of a dipole in the nano-particle. The progress in the manipulation and synthesis of these objects in the last years allowed us to apply these optical properties in a great variety of applications from efficient light absorption in solar cells to DNA spectroscopy detection. Today, one of the major challenges is the effective production of surfaces with customized visual color effects with direct applications in the development of personal identification systems according with the quest of the enhanced police security. Laser interference is a versatile technique for the production of 1D and 2D patterned surfaces. When applied to metal films, the laser irradiation induces the periodic dewetting of the metal from the substrate resulting in the formation of nanoparticles. These nanostructures are optically characterized by their surface plasmon resonance in the visible range, which in turn depends on the size or metal composition. Optical contrast between the regions transformed into nanoparticles and non-transformed regions (diffraction efficiency) can be tuned. In this work we report the production of bimetallic diffractive structures, with different [Ag]/ [Au] ratio and different motives within periodicities in the range between 1.7 microns to 6.8 microns. We will present experimental data showing that these regions have different diffraction patterns according with the periodic motive and the optical response of the nanoparticles. Thus, this technique allows a personalized optical signal to be encoded with a time-efficient and single-step laser technique.

Yves Huttel

Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain

Title: Gas Phase synthesis of Nanoparticles: Challenges and Opportunities
Speaker
Biography:

Y Huttel is Doctor from the University of Paris-Sud, Orsay, France (1995). After his degree, he worked at the Synchrotron LURE, France; at the University of Paris-Sud, France; and at the ICMM-CSIC, Spain. He was also a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Synchrotron of Daresbury Laboratory, UK, before returning to the CSIC at the IMM. He joined the Surfaces, Coatings, and Molecular Astrophysics Department at the ICMM that belongs to the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain, with a Ramón y Cajal Fellowship. Since 2007, he has been working at the ICMM as a Permanent Scientist and leads the Low- Dimensional Advanced Materials Group. His research focuses on low-dimensional systems including surfaces, interfaces and nanoparticles, as well as XMCD, XPS and nanomagnetism.

Abstract:

The increasing demand of pristine nanoparticles in nanotechnology is driving a strong effort in finding new methods and technologies for the synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs). Although the wet chemistry methods are the most popular due to their relative low cost and mass production capacities, the gas phase synthesis of NPs is getting more attention thanks to its specific advantages. This physical method is based on the evaporation of a given material (that could be performed by Laser ablation, evaporation, sputtering, etc.) followed by a controlled aggregation of the produced ions and neutrals in order to produce clusters or
nanoparticles. Since the whole process can be performed under well-controlled environment (vacuum or ultra-high vacuum) the produced nanoparticles have the same chemical composition as the base material that has been evaporated and lack of contaminants. Also the gas phase method produces quite narrow size distributions that can be tuned and even improved by the use of filtering techniques and it produces NPs that are free of ligands or surfactants that can be deposited or embedded directly on surfaces and matrices. This talk will be devoted to magnetron based Ion Cluster Sources (ICS) that have proven to be well-suited for the fabrication of pristine NPs. After a brief review of the ICS, I will address some issues that have limited the use of the ICS in industrial processes and present solutions for the scaling-up of the technology. In particular, through examples I will present the so-called Multiple Ion Cluster Sources (MICS) that has been shown to be very versatile for the production of alloyed and core-shell NPs.

Biography:

Enric Bertran-Serra is a Professor of Applied Physics of Barcelona University and a Member of the IN2UB (Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology of Barcelona University). He is the Director and a responsible Scientist of FEMAN research group on Physics and Engineering of Amorphous Materials and Nanostructures. At present, he is enrolled as a Coordinator of the project SUPERCAPS of the MICINN of Spain, to produce supercapacitors based on graphene. He has published more than 200 papers in reputed journals and is the author of more than 15 patents.

Abstract:

The phenomenology related to the growth of fullerene and graphene based nanostructures leads to a varied morphology, which depends critically on growth conditions. How to control this morphology through technology is a task requiring an exploration of new ways and modification of widely extended technologies like the classical chemical vapor deposition. In this presentation, we take a walk through a series of results achieved in our research group, with the intention of ordering in some way the many
graphene and fullerene forms found and the CVD based technologies used. The resulting morphology is extremely varied and critically dependent on the growing conditions like precursor nature, gas mixture, temperature, pressure, plasma, gas flow rate. Also, resulting morphology depends on substrate nature and its structure, and surface morphology. We have explored different conditions and substrates like copper and stainless-steel foils, Cu/c-Si, Ru/c-Si, SiO2/c-Si, quartz, Cu/quartz, in order to find the
carbon nanostructures characteristics more suitable for applications like electrodes, and planar sensors and devices.

Speaker
Biography:

Sean Reza Taklimi, currently, is a PhD candidate in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Wichita State University (WSU), USA. He has expertise in functionalization and characterization of nanomaterials, specifically, carbon nanotubes. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology in Iran and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Linkoping University, Sweden. His PhD research work is mainly focused on improvement of the mechanical properties of composite materials, using different types of nanomaterials. In the past, he has also worked as Research and Development Engineer in the area of energy and environment; furthermore, he has participated in and managed different projects during his job.

Abstract:

Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with helical configuration was performed through a reflux technique; furthermore, the influence of time and temperature as two key parameters of the treatment process were investigated. To evaluate the effectiveness of the process parameters, the functionalized helicoil nanotubes (HCNTs) were analyzed using various characterization instruments such as, Raman Spectroscopy, Visual Dispersion Test, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy (XRD). The characterization results showed that most processes parameters were effective and the surface of HCNTs were successfully modified. The functionalized HCNTs demonstrated a higher solubility and more uniform dispersion rate compared to pristine HCNTs. The results also showed that increasing the reflux time and process  temperature had no obvious effects on the solubility of HCNTs. On the other hand, prolonging of process time increased the (D/G) ratio in Raman spectrum and changed the intensities and places of the FTIR peaks. With the exception, for the functionalized HCNTs which were treated for 24 hours, all other samples exhibited at least a change in FTIR spectrum.

Swasti Wagh

Precedent of Indore Chapter of SAMAG (Seek a Miracle Ataxia Group), India

Title: Magnetic nanoparticle/ magnetic fluid approach to control neuromuscular degeneration in Friedreich’s ataxia
Speaker
Biography:

Swasti Wagh has completed her MSc in Applied Mathematics in the year 1999. She is fighting with F.A. since last 25 years and now she is on a wheelchair. She has some research publications on Magnetic Fluid. Recently, her paper on Mathematical Modeling of F.A. is accepted for publication. Since last 10 years, she is organizing camps for ataxia awareness and for the welfare of ataxia patients. She gave a presentation at SNCI conference held at AIIMS, Delhi in Feb 2013 and a presentation in DSHD congress on FA held at AIIMS, Delhi in April 2015.

Abstract:

In last two decades nanotechnology has brought a revolution in the advancement of material science, biology, biotechnology, genetics, medicine and many other areas of science and engineering. The ability of nanotechnologist to prepare material particles of nano size, coating them with a suitable surfactant and magnetizing these particles has made possible to study micro level biological entities such as cells, genes and proteins. In recent years magnetic nanoparticles have been used in cancer treatment, drug delivery and in many other medical fields. This leads us to think why this technology should not be introduced in F.A. research for which no treatment is available and patients suffer with lethal neuro- degenerarative condition of F.A. making them totally dependent on others for even the simple day to day activities. The disease is genetic and unknowingly passes on in off-springs through the carrier parents. It is therefore necessary to control degeneration in F.A. patients and make their life comfortable. Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease caused by (GAA) expansion of the FXN (frataxin) gene. FRDA is predominantly a neurodegenerative disease. It manifests in initial symptoms of poor coordination such as gait disturbance; it can also lead to scoliosis, heart disease (cardiomyopathy) and diabetes. FXN gene produces frataxin protein which is localized to the mitochondria. The function of FXN is not entirely clear, however, the primary role of FXN protein is the activation of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis in the mitochondria. In F.R.D.A. production of FXN protein is reduced. In affected individuals level of FXN drops approximately 5 to 30% than healthy individuals. The role of FXN protein is that of an iron chaperone, a companion of iron particle. Low FXN levels lead to insufficient biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters that are required for mitochondrial electron transport chain to ultimately generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy packet necessary to carry out metabolic functions in cells. FXN also regulates iron transfer in the mitochondria in order to provide a proper amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to maintain normal processes
without FXN, the energy in the mitochondria falls, and excess iron causes extra ROS to be created, leading to further cell damage. Nanotechnology can be useful to solve this problem. We can introduce body compatible magnetic nanoparticles to pickup iron particles and direct them to sulpher to form iron-sulpher clusters. Thus iron-sulpher clusters can be formed even in the absence of FXN protein in F.A. patients. And thus the process of respiration in mitochondria will continue to produce energy in the form of ATP. As iron particles are utilized in formation of iron-sulpher clusters no free iron is left to get deposited on cells and cause cell death in FRDA patents.

Speaker
Biography:

Lauryanne Teulon is currently a PhD student in INSA – Université de Toulouse, LPCNO. She has completed her graduation from the Engineering School of Centrale Marseille. She is now studying anti-counterfeiting tags made by an innovative technique, so called AFM Nanoxerography. Her research interests are nano-objects directed assembly, nanogels and microfluidic devices.

Abstract:

This work presents a simple approach for directionally assembling thermoresponsive colloidal nanogels onto surfaces in minutes using AFM nanoxerography. Charge patterns written by AFM are used as electrostatic traps to obtain complex directed assemblies of anionic nanogels (N- isopropylacrylamide copolymerized with acrylic acid) and cationic nanogels (using quaternary
ammonium functional groups). Mixed dispersions of these two types of hydrogels are also selectively sorted onto combinations of negative and positive charge patterns in various manners depending on the ratio between the concentrations of each nanogel type. Taking advantages of the fast and high resolution nanoxerography technique, this work offers a new way to separate soft nanoparticle aqueous dispersions onto surfaces. It also allows one to obtain information about the effective charge and proportion of the different nanoparticle species present in mixed colloidal dispersions and to make enviro-intelligent and tunable coatings.

Speaker
Biography:

Bin Dong is currently a PhD student at International Doctoral Innovation Centre, University of Nottingham Ningbo China. His research expertise is on materials fabrication, characterisation and electrochemistry.

Abstract:

An impinging stream reactor has been adopted for synthesis of nanoscale FePO4.2H2O particles. The experiments indicate that the application of the impinging streams is able to significantly enhance the mass transfer rate of the reactant solutions through strong turbulent eddy interactions due to the impingement of two narrow reactant streams at high velocities. The FePO4.2H2O nanocomposites were synthesised under the conditions that pH value (pH=1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0), reagent concentration (C=0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol L-1), and volumetric flow rate (V=17.15, 34.30, 51.44, 68.59 and 85.74 mL min-1) were precisely controlled. Effects of the pH value, reagent concentration, and volumetric flow rate on synthesis of FePO4.2H2O nucleus have been studied when the impinging stream reactor is to operate at nonsubmerged mode. The as-synthesised FePO4.2H2O and corresponding LiFePO4/C prodcuts were characterised by applying XRD, SEM and charge-discharge test. It has been demonstrated that under the optimised opertation condition (pH=1.6, C=1 mol L-1, V=85.74 mL min-1), the LiFePO4/C possesses the best charge-discharge performance while the discharge capacities is able to reach 152.6, 146.9, 139.1, 130.4 and 118.2 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C, 0.5 C, 1 C 2 C and 5 C current rates, respectively. It was revealed that the LiFePO4/C synthesised at pH=2.0, C=1 mol L-1, V=85.74 mL min-1 has the most stable cycling performance with the discharge capacities reaching 140.6 and 141.8 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.5 C at the first and the 100th cycles, respectively.

Speaker
Biography:

Heba ElSayed ElZorkany received her BSc in Biotechnology from Benha University in 2006. She joined the National Institution of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University as a Post-graduate student and she was awarded with a Diploma degree in Laser Applications in Biotechnology and Photobiology in 2008. She completed her MSc degree in 2013 “The photothermal effect of metallic nanoparticles on bacteria”. She has enrolled in the PhD program at NILES, since 2014 to conduct her thesis titeled “Efficiency of biocompatible quantum dot for cellular imaging using confocal laser scanning microscope”. She has been appointed as a Researcher at Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Central Lab. (NAMCL), Agriculture Research Center (ARC) since 2010. Her research experiences include biotechnology, microbiology, photobiology, laser applications in biology, nanotechnology, spectroscopy, and microscopy. She is a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) & Cell Culture Specialist. She has participated in several international conferences.

Abstract:

The fast-growing nanotechnology provides every day new type of materials to fulfill the biomedical needs. Whereas infections caused by pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria has become one of the most worrying problems that the human health and economy suffer from and what makes the development of new effective alternatives to classical antibiotics an urgent need. Nanotechnology has generated a novel class of photothermally sensitized agents –gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Depending on the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoscale particles new therapy has been established called plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT). PPTT has attracted new interest in cancer therapy and also against microbes. The current research aims to assess the PPTT of AuNPs against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) bacteria. Different concentrations of AuNPs capped with different polymers (polyvinyl alcohol (AuNPs -PVA) or Polyvinylpyrrolidone (AuNPs -PVP) were applied on E. coli and B. cereus in dark and under the irradiation of several doses of the light emitting diode (LED 530 nm). Results showed that the maximum antibacterial effect occurred at 10 μM of AuNPs -PVP in the presence of 0.9 J/cm2 of LED. Finally, it was concluded that PPTT with gold nanoparticles considered as an effective method for bacterial eradication as AuNPs induce hyperthermia in the surrounding environment of bacteria upon irradiation which causes cell damage. Also, the capping material of AuNPs plays an important role in its biological effect.