Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 14th International Conference on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Madrid, Spain.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Masaru Matsuo photo
Biography:

Masaru Matsuo has completed his PhD from Kyoto University in Japan and was a Professor of Nara Women’s University. After his retirement, he became a full time Professor of Dalian University of Technology in China. Since September 1st 2014, he is a Visiting Professor of Dalian University of Technology. He has published more than 200 papers in refereed journal articles. He is IUPAC fellow and received Certificate of Membership Award of ACS (July 2015~July 2018). He received “The Award of the Society of Fiber Science and Technology of Japan” in May 1990, “Paul Flory Polymer Research Prize” in April 2010 and “Certificate of Friendship Award of Liaoning Province in China” in September 2011.

Abstract:

PTC materials play important roles in promoting significant applications to floor heating and loft heating in order to get rid of snow removing by humans. To assure comfortable daily living in winter, the cost effective floor heating and loft heating must be established. Obviously, light PTC materials as heating elements have advantages for saving construction cost of building circulation rather than heavy hot water tubes in addition to the safety and cleanliness. Recently, PTC materials for floor heating and loft heating tend to be adopted on designing rooms in an apartment building. However, when earthquake with low frequency generate in winter, the residents must consider the serious damages. Certainly, since the serious damage of bank building by low frequency earthquake (0.1~2 Hz) at Mexico in 1985, the horrors of low-frequency earthquake have been investigated in terms to predominant period of ground and natural frequency of the construction materials relating to building height. Accordingly, the serious damages of recent buildings tend to decrease by the new design methods for preventing collapse of constructions. Different from such earthquake counter measures, however, there is no report on the damage of PTC materials against low-frequency earthquake, since no experimental method has been established for the frequency dependence of mechanical properties under applied electric fields. This presentation is focused on frequency dependence of the complex dynamic tensile modulus of PTC materials under applied electric field. Fine home-made attachments were fixed on a commercial visco-elastic spectrometer to measure the modulus with different frequencies at the desired temperatures. Efforts were done to determine static strain in order to place the sample in tension during axial sinusoidal oscillation. The measurements were carried out for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)-nickel (Ni) coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites which have been adopted as PTC materials. The drastic descent of the storage modulus was confirmed in lower frequency range (0.01~2 Hz) at surface temperature (Ts) elevated by Joule heat. That is, storage modulus by self-heating is much lower than that by external heating at the same temperature. This tendency became considerable beyond 65°C. The
composite was cut when Ts was beyond 93°C. In contrast, the cutting did not occur in higher frequency range (100~10 Hz) at Ts=105°C. The present fundamental work warns that protection of PTC materials used as floor heating must be taken into consideration in terms of low frequency earthquake in addition of the seismic intensity.

Keynote Forum

Alain Demourgues

University of Bordeaux, France

Keynote: The world of fluorine-based nano-materials: Past, present and future
OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alain Demourgues photo
Biography:

A Demourgues is working at ICMCB-CNRS-UPR9048 since October 1993 as Research Fellow. He became Research Director at CNRS in October 2008. He received IBM-France award in 1993 (Young Scientist in Materials Science) and SFC (Société Française de Chimie) award in 2003 (Solid State Chemistry division). He is Consulting Scientist since 1998 at RHODIA-SOLVAY in the field of Solid State Chemistry, Redox and Opto-electronic properties.

Abstract:

The aim of this presentation is to illustrate, considering various new ‘nano’ oxy(hydroxyl)fluorides prepared by hydrothermal routes, the key role of cationic/anionic vacancies allow relaxing the structure (bond distances and angles) which explain outstanding physical-chemical properties (reactivity, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and electrochemistry). Nanoparticles of crystallized phases have been obtained by microwave assisted solvothermal routes using HF, various solvents and precursors
leading to control the composition, the crystal structure, the nanosize particles and the surface area. The case of Ti-based oxy(hydroxy)fluorides with Ti vacancies and unexpected UV shielding properties with band gap around 3.2eV and small refractive index around 1.9 will be presented. Al fluoride hydrate also with cationic vacancies, structural water and fluorine as ligands of Al3+ ions, has been synthesized and exhibits Lewis-Brönsted acidities. The strong acidic behavior highlights
the effect of water molecules/cationic vacancies on the surface structure. Both these compounds adopt also derived ReO3 frameworks. Ti vacancies can be also stabilized in derived Hexagonal Tungsten Bronzes (HTB) and anatase form containing O2-, OH- and F- species but the cationic vacancies rate remains smaller in these last cases than in the previous ReO3 form. The more complex case of trivalent Fe-based oxyfluorides will be presented by outlining the occurrence of cationic and anionic
vacancies in this network where these compounds adopt the HTB used as cathodes in Li-ion battery. Finally, nanoparticles of tetravalent Ce-based oxyfluorides with fluorite-type structure where anions are in tetrahedral sites, have been prepared by co-precipitation in basic (pH=12) medium. The presence of Ca2+ partially substituted for Ce4+ and F- for O2- allows tuning the optical band gap at the UV-Visible frontier and obtaining new UV absorbers with low refractive index. The role played by fluorine substituting for O2-/OH- ions will be highlighted which allows creating cationic and anionic vacancies in these nanomaterials and contributes to tune the optical absorption properties as well as the acidic and redox properties.

Keynote Forum

Edward Yi Chang

National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan

Keynote: Nano scale InGaAs FinFET for post Si CMOS application

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Edward Yi Chang photo
Biography:

Edward Yi Chang has received the PhD degree from University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in 1985. In 1992, he joined National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Hsinchu, Taiwan. He is currently a Senior Vice President of National Chiao Tung University, Dean of Research and Development of NCTU, Dean of International Semiconductor School and Chair Professor of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Electronics Engineering. He is an IEEE Fellow and a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Electron Devices Society. His current research interests include III-V compounds based devices for power, electrical and optical applications. He holds more than 30 patents worldwide and has been author or co-author of more than 120 papers in the related research areas.

Abstract:

To meet Moore’s law, the academia and industry have worked rigorously to develop advanced technologies in order to reach the ITRS roadmap standard. However, as the devices are reaching their physical limits, we are facing challenges; two most effectively ways to keep the device scaling are either using different transistor architectures or using advanced high mobility channels. Among many III-V compound semiconductors, InxGa1-xAs materials are the most promising candidates as high electron mobility channels for scaling CMOS devices to satisfy the quest of future logic applications. Besides, high-k materials, owning to its high permittivity is very critical material for integrating with III-V semiconductors in sub-nanometer technology regions. Unfortunately, inherently poor quality of high-k/III-V interfaces, which degrades the gate controllability and the channel mobility, has not been overcome yet. To achieve high efficiency and low power consumption high-k/III-V MOS devices, the MOS structures should have high interface quality in conjunction with a suitable and reliable dielectric gate stack. In addition, the gate metals must have effective work functions aligned with the band edges of the channel materials, as well as a small work function variation. This talk focuses on the metal/high-k/InGaAs interface study and several new results of the InGaAs FinFETs will be presented which can be the key technologies for next generation InGaAs channel based CMOS
technology.

Keynote Forum

Mohammad I Younis

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Nanoelectromechanical resonators for logic operations
OMICS International Nanomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad I Younis photo
Biography:

Mohammad I Younis received his PhD degree in Engineering Mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2004. Since 2004, he has been serving as an Assistant and then as an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the State University of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY, USA. Currently, he is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia, where he has served as a Director of the MEMS and NEMS Characterization and Motion Laboratory. He is a recipient of the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities in 2012, the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award in 2009, and the Paul E Torgersen Graduate Research Excellence Award in 2002. He serves as an Associate Editor of Nonlinear Dynamics, the Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, and the Journal of Vibration and Control.

Abstract:

There has been remarkable interest in nanomechanical computing elements, which can potentially lead to a new era in computation due to their re-configurability, high integration density, and high switching speed. The last decade has witnessed increasing research interest in mechanical computing for scalable mechanical computing elements. This has been primarily driven by the need to overcome the higher leakage current and power dissipation of the transistor technology, which have become pronounced as the technology is reaching its physical limit. Downscaling MEMS devices into the nano regime offers exciting opportunities for realizing devices of ultralow power consumption, high sensitivity, and high integration density. The ongoing progress in nanofabrication technologies has enabled exploration of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) for mechanical computing for memory and logic gate devices. In this work, we present an in-plane nanomechanical beam resonator, operated in its linear regime, capable of dynamically performing NOR, NOT, XNOR, XOR, and AND logic operations. The stiffness of the nano-beam and hence its resonance frequency is modulated electro- thermally with two DC voltage sources representing the logic inputs. We also present for the first time an in-depth investigation into the performance of such electromechanical resonators under the effect of frequency fluctuations with temperature variation. The performance
of this re-configurable logic device is examined at elevated temperatures, ranging from 25°C to 85°C, demonstrating its resilience for most of the logic operations. The proposed device can potentially achieve switching rate in μ sec, switching energy in nJ, and an integration density up to 106 per cm2. The practical realization of this re-configurable device paves the way for nano-elements-based mechanical computing.

  • Track 11 : Insilico nanostructure modelling Track 12 : Applications of Nanomaterials Track 13 : Characterization and properties of Nanomaterials Track 14 : Advanced Nanomaterials Track 15 : Nanotech products Track 16 : Nanodevices and Systems Track 17 : Nanomedical Devices Track 18 : Nanotechnology applications Track 19 : Biomedical Nanomaterials
Location: 09:00
Speaker

Chair

J Vidal-Gancedo

Institut of Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Spain

Speaker

Co-Chair

Nadezhda Nebogatikova

Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Speaker
Biography:

Amparo Luna received her Bachelor´s degree in Chemical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz in 1996 and PhD degree in the Organic Chemistry Program in 2002 from the Universidad de Oviedo, Spain, under the supervision of Prof. Vicente Gotor and Dr. Covadonga Astorga. In 2003, she joined the research group of Prof. Roland Furstoss at Faculté des Sciences de Luminy (Lab. Associé au CNRS, in Marseille (France) as a  Post-doctoral fellow. In 2004, she moved to the research group of Prof. Benito Alcaide (UCM, Madrid) where, in 2006, she was appointed as Assistant Professor and in 2015 she assumed a position of Associate Professor. Her research interests are focused on beta-lactam and allene chemistry, and metal-catalyzed coupling reactions.

Abstract:

Allenes are a class of compounds with two cumulative carbon-carbon double bonds, which are versatile synthetic intermediates in organic synthesis. These substrates have allowed chemists to prepare a variety of compounds of chemical and biological interest. The abundance of nitrogen-containing heterocycles in biologically active  molecules has occasioned many efforts for their synthesis and functionalization. In particular, the oxacycles is important because they are present in a wide range of natural products. On the other hand, in the design of eco-friendly processes, catalysts and solvents play a key factor from both an economic and environmental point of view. In the development of new chemical processes the reactions conditions should fulfill specific criteria: i) renewable feedstocks, ii) low VOC emission, iii) low flammability and iv) functional group compatibility. In our continuing efforts on the construction of potentially bioactive heterocycles, we have developed a new catalytic process using metal nanoparticles because of; NPs tend to be more reactive than their particulate metal counterparts as a result of increasing surface area with decreasing particle size. Palladium nanoparticles are one of the most used and efficient catalyst in the formation of C-C bond and other chemical transformations such as carbon-hetero atom bond formation. Herein, we described the use, for the first time, of a novel ligand-free catalytic system for obtaining the cyclization of allenols towards the preparation of  dihydrofurans and carbazoles. The prepared nanomaterial (PdNPs) displayed good activity on the construction of potentially bioactive heterocycles in aqueous media, providing good to excellent yields. The recyclability of the nanocatalyst has also been established (up to four cycles) giving rise to good isolated yields in successive runs.

Speaker
Biography:

Nadezhda Nebogatikova has her expertise in the area of graphene functionalization, graphene quantum dots, suspensions and inks for 2D-inkjet printing. She has found an approach to create different fluorinated graphene-based materials. Her investigations of graphene fluorination opened new pathways for improving graphene-based devices with a wide range of electronic and structural properties. She has 14 publications and worked at Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS in Novosibirsk since 2010.

Abstract:

Graphene electronics needs new materials with tunable electronic properties due to a set of excellent electronic and structural graphene properties and the zero band-gap in its electronic structure. The traditional pathways to open the bandgap in graphene layers are nanolithography. Unfortunately, there is a dramatic decrease in carrier mobility due to chemically active dangling bonds near the formed edges. The stability of graphene-based nanostructures without edge atoms has been investigated recently. One can create such materials by embedding graphene islands into a stable matrix. Such approach was realized in our previous studies of graphene layers and suspensions fluorination. Another decision is to cut holes in neighboring graphene layers and to bond the chemically active atoms from different layers forming a closed structure of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms. We used high energy ions (26-167 MeV) to create perforated few-layer graphene films. Both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy both demonstrate nanosized holes (20-40 nm in diameter) formed by ions irradiation. The initial ions energy determines the amount of  electronic loss and the value of a sharp local temperature rise in the films. As a consequence, the type of the holes edge may be reconstructed in the range from the dangling bonds to connected edges. We observed the bandgap and electric active traps appearance, dependently on ions energy. We found the conditions for tuning the film electronic and structural properties. The formation of a continuous graphene surface between two perforated layers is very attractive as well as for nanoelectronic devices because of the band-gap appearance in its electronic band structure, opportunity to save the carrier mobility and capability to transmit high electric currents in contrast to nanostructured graphene and semiconducting graphene nanoribbons. Moreover, such nanostructures are promising for sensors and molecule filters.

J Vidal-Gancedo

Institut of Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Spain

Title: Au nanoparticles labeled with organic radicals
Speaker
Biography:

J Vidal-Gancedo is a Tenured Scientist at the Materials Science Institut of Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC and Researcher at the Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona, Spain. He obtained a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Barcelona in 1993. Actually also he is Scientist In-Charge of the ICMAB Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Laboratory and President of The Spanish Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Group, GERPE. His research interest focuses on molecular functional materials based on organic radicals, molecular nanoscience, and nanomedicine. He authored of more than 145 journal papers in peer reviewed journals including several book chapters and 3 patents. His work have received more than 3000 citations and his h factor actualy is 31.

Abstract:

A series of Au nanoparticles functionalised with high coverage of TEMPO-modified disulfide have been prepared and studied by EPR, UV-Vis, TEM microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). In order to increase the coverage of spin labels on the particle surface, heat-induced size evolution and ligand exchange reactions were used. A one-pot reaction at room temperature led to gold nanoparticles with a controlled large size (ca. 7 nm) and high coverage of radicals. These nanoparticles showed a |Δms| = 2 transition at half-field which gives direct evidence of the presence of a high-spin state and allows an EPR study of the nature of the magnetic coupling between the spins. The results showed dominant antiferromagnetic interactions between radicals but at lower temperatures a ferromagnetic contribution was observed. The same diradical has been studied in solution, crystal and anchored to Au (111) flat surface showing anisotropic magnetic properties. We have also synthesized gold nanoparticles functionalized with high coverage of nitronyl nitroxide radical that preserve the same thermally modulated spin exchange radical interaction observed for the diradical in solution. This result has significant importance for developing functional hybrid surfaces and opens the possibility to be used as a new class of spin markers.

Yo Tanaka

RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center, Japan

Title: Development of ultra-thin glass based micro/nano fluidic
Speaker
Biography:

Yo Tanaka received his PhD degree from the University of Tokyo. He worked as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, and has been working as a Unit Leader in the Quantitative Biology Center, RIKEN, Japan, since 2011.

Abstract:

A microchip (also called as micro fluidic chip or micro chemical chip) is a palm sized small board with micro and nano fluidic channels fabricated by micro or nano machining techniques. It is widely utilized for the integration of complicated chemical and biochemical experimental processes. This is a spin-off technology from integrated circuit fabrication techniques in the field of electronics and information technology. Currently, it is applied to various wet processes in chemistry and biology and a number of sophisticated systems have been developed till now. There are several advantages including, saving the amount of chemical reagents and short analysis time. By exploiting these significant advantages, various kinds of chemical systems such as analysis, synthesis and cellular experiments have been integrated onto a microchip. Regarding this microchip technology, the author has developed several original technologies on fabrication, fluid control and construction of mechanical devices for bio-analysis. For example, totally glass based micro valves, pumps, filters and ultra-thin, flexible glass microchips as shown in Figure 1 have been demonstrated based on an
ultra-thin glass sheet handling techniques. In this work, these achievements are comprehensively introduced.

Marta Lara

Instituto Tecnológico del embalaje, Spain

Title: Nanoparticles in plastic materials for food contact applications
Speaker
Biography:

Marta Lara-Lledó is an Agricultural Engineer specialized in Food Industries from Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV). She has a Master’s and a PhD in Food Science and Engineering (UPV) and a Diploma in Packaging from Instituto Tecnológico del Embalaje, Transporte y Logística (ITENE). Since 2007, she is Technical
and Project Manager of New Materials and Packaging Systems department at ITENE. Nowadays, She is responsible for the Food Safety Area. She is working on several R&D projects specifically related to food packaging. She is specialized in the development, characterization and authorization of new packaging materials,
including the implementation of food contact materials legislation and verification processes for the proper performance and good manufacturing practices of the packaging materials.

Abstract:

Nanoparticles can be used in food contact materials to improve barrier, mechanical and thermal properties of biodegradable materials. The use of nanoparticles also allows the development of lightweight non-renewable polymers, maintaining their barrier, mechanical and thermal properties with less thickness. The use of nanoparticles is also possible for the development of active and intelligent materials with improved properties. Focusing on the improvement of biodegradable polymers properties, the formulation of organoclays and their incorporation into a PLA matrix allowed an increase of its barrier properties (↓ 25% OTR, ↓ 21% WVTR), mechanical properties (↑ 40-45% compression resistance) and an improvement of thermal properties. The reinforcement of barrier and mechanical properties of a PLA matrix was also using nanocelluloses extracted from different plants by-products (flax, hemp, oat, etc.). According to the plastic European Regulation for food contact materials (EU) Nº 10/2011, chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles could differ from those at large scale, leading to different toxicological properties. Therefore, case-by-case, risk assessment should be performed, and they can only be used if explicitly authorized and mentioned in Annex 1 of the plastic regulation. In the recent years, a notable increase in the number of authorized nanoparticles for food contact applications has been noticed in Europe, but harmonized measurement methods must be still developed to obtain consistent results over time and between laboratories. For the authorization of nanoparticles in US, a safety assessment should be also performed through a Food Contact Notification Program or alternative programs such as Threshold of Regulation (TOR) exemptions. The authorization procedures should be considered for the commercialization of these materials for food contact applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Krishnamurthy G has completed his MPhil and PhD from Bangalore University after his Master’s in the same University. He is having a total of 16 years of teaching experience. During his tenure as Sir C V Raman Post-doctoral Fellow (2013-2014), he visited Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory, Berkely, CA, US. His research interests lie in nano/energy materials, electrochemisty, bio-medical materials, etc. He has published 28 papers in reputed journals and guided PhD students. He is a reviewer of several reputed international journals.

Abstract:

The efficient and cost effective electrocatalysts are of great interest for energy application due to the high cost and other associated problems of the existing ones. Here, in this work, the preparation of efficient electrocatalyst/substrate system by electroless deposition of non-noble metal nanoparticles, in particular the Ni/Multiwalled Carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) has been prepared and tested for Methanol and Ethanol oxidation. The MWCNTs were synthesized by solvotehrmal procedure at a low temperature range of about 180–220°C in an autoclave system. The products were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Nickel nanoparticles with a size range of 5-10 nm were distributed almost uniformly on the surface of MWCNTs. The Ni/MWCNTs electrode has exhibited
remarkably higher current density of 145 mA/cm2 and a lower onset potential of -0.3 V in 0.1M CH3OH with 0.1 M H2SO4. The calculated average active surface area of MWCNTs and Ni/ MWCNTs’ electrode are 0.45 x 10-3 cm2 and 0.51 x 10-3 cm2 respectively and the surface coverage of Ni/MWCNTs’ electrode was 2.4409×10-7 mol/cm2. A significant electrocatalytic activity of Ni/MWCNTs for the oxidation of methanol and ethanol in acidic medium has been observed, which could be a positive result to be harnessed as a non-noble electrocatalyst/electrode system to improve the efficiency of the direct alcohol fuel cells.

Speaker
Biography:

Heba ElSayed ElZorkany received her BSc in Biotechnology from Benha University in 2006. She joined the National Institution of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University as a Post-graduate student and she awarded a Diploma degree in Laser Applications in Biotechnology and Photobiology in 2008. She completed her MSc degree in 2013 (The photothermal effect of metallic nanoparticles on bacteria). She has enrolled in the PhD program at NILES, since 2014 to conduct her thesis titled “Efficiency of biocompatible quantum dot for cellular imaging using confocal laser scanning microscope”. She has been appointed as a Researcher at Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Central Lab. (NAMCL), Agriculture Research Center (ARC) since 2010. Her research experiences include biotechnology, microbiology, photobiology, laser applications in biology, nanotechnology, spectroscopy, and microscopy. She is Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) & Cell Culture Specialist. She has participated in several international conferences.

Abstract:

Owing to its intrinsic photophysical properties quantum dots (QDs) act as a new tool for imaging and drug delivery. In this study, biocompatible silica-coated QDs were synthesized in order to track their cellular uptake in cancer cells. Firstly, Trioctylphosphine oxide capped CdSe QDs were synthesized by organometallic routes and ZnS shell were grown on them by injection solution of diethylzinc (Zn (Et)2) and hexamethyldislathiane ((TMS)2S) as Zn and S precursors. CdSe/ZnS QDs were then rendered water soluble by over-coating with silica using 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) as silica precursor. The toxicological effects of silica-coated
CdSe/ZnS (Si-QDs) were investigated by exposing hep-G2 cells to different concentrations of Si-QDs then the mitochondrial activity was evaluated using WST-1 kit. The intracellular localization of Si-QDs in hep-G2 cells was investigated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) equipped with CO2 incubator up to six hours. All stages of QDs formation were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, emission spectroscopy TEM, XRD, DLS and ζ-potential. Results showed that, high fluorescence QDs were synthesized with a size between 2 and 4 nm. Also, Silica coating process yielded final particle sizes of 6-18 nm which possessed strong luminescence
property. The cytotoxicity test results showed that Si-QDs were nontoxic even at higher concentrations as cells remained viable when exposed to Si-QDs at the highest concentration of 100 nM. The fluorescence imaging of hep-G2 cells exposed to Si-QDs by CLSM time lapse mode for 6 hours depicted the fast internalization of Si-QDs into the cells producing good fluorescence in the cytoplasmic portion. These results confirmed the effective role of these fluorescent materials in biological labeling and imaging applications.

Francesca Costanzo

Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology - ICN2, CSIC and BIST, Spain

Title: Thermal properties of graphene nanoflakes dispersed in DMF: a classical MD study including QM corrections
Speaker
Biography:

Francesca Costanzo has completed her PhD research at the University of Bologna, in 2000 with a thesis entitled: “Modified electrodes by conducting polymers”. Since her PhD, she combined her experimental experience with the theoretical work at different levels of approximation in the fields of solid state physics and condensed matter. Her competence in ab initio MD simulation allowed her to model, for example, the interaction of molecules on carbon materials (graphene, single and double walled nanotubes, fullerenes), and water splitting chemistry on transition metal oxide surfaces. She acquired her computational knowledge working at prestigious universities and institutions in Cambridge, Leiden, Padua and Barcelona. Her output includes 30 scientific articles, many invited talks and oral presentations.

Abstract:

Ionic liquids are one of the preferred options used by the industry for the storage of thermal energy in solar energy plants. Improving their thermophysical properties is an important goal to achieve more efficient heat storage and transportation media. A promising approach for improving these properties is to introduce nanoparticles dispersed in the ionic liquid or the molten salt, the so-called nanofluids. However, how thermophysical properties such as the heat capacity, self-diffusion, or heat conductivity depend on the microstructure of the nanofluids is still rather unknown. Molecular simulation, therefore, can play a major role in this research, as producing reliable experimental data for these systems is difficult and expensive. We have calculated by classical molecular dynamic simulations, thermal properties of disk-like graphene nanoflakes dispersed in organic solvent. In my contribution, I will discuss how the heat capacity and the thermal conductivity depend on the shape, the size and the density of the dispersed carbon nanoflakes. While thermal conductivity is well simulated by our classical model, the insertion of quantum corrections (QM) is necessary to calculate the heat capacity in good agreement with experiments. With our classical model including QM corrections, we are able
to shed light and gather basic understanding on the dependence of thermal transport properties on the nature of solute-solute and solute-solvent interaction.

Speaker
Biography:

Romana Shahzadi is currently pursuing her PhD from University of Punjab, Lahore. She worked as Research Associate (2014-2016) at Centre for Environmental Protection Studies, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs, Lahore. She has completed her MPhil in Plant Genomics and Biotechnology from Agriculture University of Peshawar.

Abstract:

The metallic nanoparticles synthesis includes top-down and bottom-up method by means of chemical, physical and biological approach. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles is classified under bottom-up approach. Silver nanoparticles have the distinctive characteristics of anticancer, antimicrobial, catalytic and larvicidal activities. The Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) have larvicidal activities against mosquitoes. So, the bacterial spore mixture is used for biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. Nano particles were characterized using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy for the confirmation of nano particles. XRD and SEM were used for the analysis of size and structure. The particle sizes were measured through SEM imaging ranging from 40 to 144.9 nm. The Bt-Ag NPs have mixed cubic and hexagonal structures. Interestingly, the mortality induced by Bt-AgNPs was comparatively high than that of the control against third instar larvae of A. aegypti (LC50 0.01 ppm and LC90 0.5 ppm) in all the tested concentrations, viz. 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ppm. Hence, the Bti-AgNPs nanoparticles would be significantly used as larvicidal against dengue vector mosquitoes Aedes aegypti.

Speaker
Biography:

Peng-Sheng Wei received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering Department at University of California, Davis, in 1984. He has been a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering of National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, since 1989. He has contributed to advancing the
understanding of and to the applications of electron and laser beam, plasma, and resistance welding through theoretical analyses coupled with verification experiments. Investigations also include studies of their thermal and fluid flow processes, and formations of the defects such as humping, rippling, spiking and porosity. He has published more than 80 journal papers, given keynote or invited speeches in international conferences more than 90 times. He is a Fellow of AWS (2007), and a Fellow of ASME (2000). He also received the Outstanding Research Achievement Awards from both National Science Council (2004), and NSYSU
(1991, 2001 and 2004), the Outstanding Scholar Research Project Winner Award from National Science Council (2008), the Adams Memorial Membership Award from AWS (2008), the Warren F Savage Memorial Award from AWS (2012), and the William Irrgang Memorial Award from AWS (2014). He has been the Xi- Wan Chair Professor of NSYSU since 2009, and Invited Distinguished Professor in the Beijing University of Technology, China, during 2015-2017.

Abstract:

Pore formation and its shape in solid influence not only microstructure of materials, but also contemporary issues of various sciences of biology, engineering, foods, geophysics and climate change, etc. In order to remove and control porosity, understanding its formation is important. A pore formed in solid is a consequence of a bubble nucleated by super-saturation and entrapped by a solidification front. This work accounts for realistic mass and momentum transport across a self-consistently and analytically determined shape of the bubble cap, whose surface is in physico-chemical equilibrium beyond the solidification front. Accurate determination of contact angle from a realistic shape of the cap is required to predict the relevant shape of the pore in solid. It was systematically found that there are two different solute transport models subject to thin and thick thicknesses of concentration boundary layers on the solidification front. Case 1 accounts for species transport from the pore across an emerged cap through a thin concentration boundary layer on the solidification front into surrounding liquid in the early stage, whereas Case 2 is subject to species transport from the surrounding liquid across a submerged cap within a thick concentration boundary layer into the pore. The results find increases in interfacial properties such as Henry’s law constant and Bond number decrease the pore radius. The predicted pore shape agrees with experimental data. A realistic prediction and control of the growth of the pore shape has therefore been obtained.

Speaker
Biography:

Wilson Engelmann has obtained his PhD in Law/Unisinos (Brazil) and a Professor and Researcher of the Post-Graduate Program in Law, Master and Doctorate and Executive Coordinator of the Professional Master’s in Corporate Law and Business Law both at University of the Sinos Valley – Unisinos, Brazil. He is the Leader of JUSNANO Research Group and a scholarship holder of Research Productivity CNPq/Brazil. He is developing a research project, since 2008, on regulatory issues related to nanotechnologies and analysis of their social and ethical impacts.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The use of nanoscale is currently growing: in research, industrial production and in the consumer market. There is no state legislative regulation on the matter. There is the rise of self-regulation, as well as the creation of norms by other social actors. The system of Law needs to enter in the context of innovation, granting legal effects to this regulatory production. The temporality of the new forms of regulation and the ability to deal with future risks and damages represent other challenges for the legal area.


Purpose of this study: It is based on the 79 documents of the OECD "Series on the Safety of Manufactured Nanomaterials", is to analyze the perception of risks and the way that the juridicization of the unknown future damages that might be generated from the manipulation of the nanoscale, especially in relation to human health and the preservation of the environment.


Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: the functionalist method will be used in a systemic-constructivist perspective, risk theory (Luhmann) and content analysis (Bardin). Comprehensive keywords were used to enable data collection in the 79 documents, which
are: "risk", "environmental safety" or "environment", "human health" and "manufactured nanomaterial".


Findings: The word "manufactured nano-material" has 4,934 repetitions; "Risk" has 4,214 repetitions; "Environment" has 2,204 repetitions and "human health" has 1,478 repetitions. This shows extreme concern about the risks which nanomaterials could pose to the environment and human health.


Conclusion & Significance: the observed keywords show that manufactured nano-materials may generate risks for the environment and human health, with little concern for the environmental safety, which has only 48 repetitions. For this reason it is important to
structure the framework as a legal risk management tool for nanotechnology companies to gather information and deal with future and uncertain damages. In this scenario is relevant an adequate evaluation of the ethical-social impacts in the structuring of selfregulation.